Parcheesi 40K: Khorne vs. Ultramarines

My husband and I like to play Parcheesi off and on as a quick, low commitment way to get a little gaming in when the mood strikes us. It often works out for some reason that my dice tend to fall so I have late game zergs where I roll a lot of doubles and hence get to cover a lot of ground quickly with my pawns. I often play the green pieces and when this strangely ubiquitous phenomenon begins I have taken to “Declaring the Waaagh!”*

This gave me a spur of the moment idea: why not use our long-neglected Warhammer 40K pieces to play Parcheesi?**

I decided upon a tetrad of bloodletters, including one with a horn and of course their Banner of Hate probably constructed from the flayed skins of their victims. My husband used four of his Ultramarines he painted some years ago. The fact he had a missile launcher made me a little nervous but at least it wasn’t a flamer or that scary Assault on Black Reach captain!

The Ultramarines took an early game lead by getting two marines into the home square as you can see below.*** However, the forces of Khorne had some rather Tzeentch-like tricks up their sleeves where they posted themselves on the blue safety squares in an attempt to take the skull of the unfortunate banner sergeant.****

The Ultramarine banner sergeant turned out to be tricky as space marines in general that chapter in particular are known for. Thanks to some well executed maneuvers and dice tricks he was able to avoid my blue square snares and post himself with his colleague in a protective blockade. Unfortunately for the bad guys, my tricky Tzeentchian-Khornate bloodletters had a very strong position with a blue square blockade of their own with one of their fellows (top left corner) waiting to pounce.*****

I’m sad to report that despite everything, my daemonic blockading plans fell flat and both marines were able to escape past my red home row unmolested. (Note the position of both marines in the picture below relative to the picture above.) My daemons have to move up into the home row toward the home square so anything past that is safe territory for the Imperium.

It is a tight game. Two marines are already in the home square but the balance of my forces are a bit closer to home. Still, I’d say at this point it is a small advantage to my husband’s squad.

In the end I had my usual late game zerg but then so did the Ultramarines. Happily, the Khornate good guys won but it was a close thing: the last marine was in his home row only two squares from victory. So the game was almost as near a thing to a draw as you can get in Parcheesi.

The marines failed to close the warp portal before a massive incursion of Khorne goodness vomits into real space. The imperial fall back plan of Exterminatus fails when their bombs are possessed by daemons. Their primitive machine spirits become existentially enraged so the bombs immediately launch themselves toward the nearest highly populated worlds. Perhaps in a future game of Parcheesi 40K we’ll see if the space marine fleet can catch both the daemons and their own rogue bombs in time!


* I wish I could claim credit for thinking this up but it was my husband who first mentioned it, harkening back to our old 5th edition 40K games of marines versus space orks that always seemed to end somehow in my guys moving absurdly quickly all at once, overrunning his forces in a painful but mercifully short episode of buckets of dice being rolled and sanguine massacre. Actually it didn’t happen all the time: I think my husband forgets all of the times where his guys shot half my army off the table by turn two but hey I’m probably biased.

** The older 25mm bases worked well for doing this. I don’t think the newer 32mm bases would have done the trick because they are too big for the squares.

*** Sweet, sweet victory is achieved by getting all four of your pieces into the home square before your opponent does. Given the You Go/I Go nature of the game, a tie is not possible though I do remember a game I played as a child where my opponent got mad and flipped the board and tried to declare it a draw. She wasn’t the nicest of losers and sometimes used the same pernicious tactic in Candyland.

**** The blue squares are “safety zones” where pieces are safe from capture by the enemy. On the white squares, you may capture an enemy piece by rolling a number that allows you to end your move on the opponent’s square, sending him back to his home circle. Skulls for the Parcheesi Throne!

***** A blockade is formed by having two of your own pieces on a square. Neither your own nor the enemy’s pawns can move through a blockade. A blue square blockade is stronger still, because when you move a piece, breaking the blockade, your other piece is not vulnerable to attack. It is a common tactic to try and capture an opponent’s pawn by denying it the ability to move by means of a blockade, and use another piece behind to threaten a capture.

Miniatures of Magnitude Painting Challenge Round-up

May through June saw the Miniatures of Magnitude painting challenge where the idea is to paint something that is on the larger side.  The model didn’t need to be large, but it had to represent something large.  As I wrote back in early May, “Aircraft, daemon engines, tanks, giants, trains, cavewomen riding mammoths, ships, and beasts that are great, writhing masses of tentacles, eyes, and maws that tumbled down from the stars or crawled up out of the sewer all will find a home in this challenge.”

As usual, if I missed anyone, please let me know and I’ll make sure you make it into the (amended) round-up.

Flying Battleship by John of Just Needs Varnish ink sketch clip art effect

First up is Wudugast’s of Convert or Die Warcry bell tower, complete with gibbets and “fiddly” skeletons.  I’m glad he included the skeletons because I think they add an osseous touch of class to the piece.

Belltower by Wudugast

Wudugast also painted this very nice Chaos Space Marine Obliterator. Our heretic astartes is bristling with weapons of all kinds, as you would expect. He’s got some sort of assault cannon, a heavy flamer, a hefty power fist complete with little claws … heck, let’s face it, the only thing he’s missing are pants!

Next up is Tom’s Imperial Knight Castellan.  I know Tom because he used to work at the local game store I often frequent.  Some time ago, Tom made the trek north from Santa Cruz to Stockton, California where he opened his own store, Dragon’s Den Games.

Tom Douglass Imperial Knight front view

Tom’s knight is the largest model he has painted to date.  He says that it has “technically more surface area than a Bloodthirster” and the latter being “mostly skin and wing so they go a heck of a lot faster, especially with Contrasts!”.  I’m glad Tom persevered because I think his knight came out looking good and will surely strike terror into the hearts of his many nefarious foes.

Look to the skies! David, of Scent of a Gamer, painted a huge dragon who is just waiting to blot out the sun as it soars through a fantasy sky on xanthous wings. David tells us that this miniature is “from the Dragons Don’t Share boxed set that was originally released as part of the Bones II Kickstarter.”

Green Dragon by Scent of a Gamer

David used a “dark green/black mix” for the body and contrast paints for the wings.  He was going for an “eye of Mordor” feel with the dragon’s eyes and I think he succeeded because the eye reminded me of that when I was looking at the pictures in his post before reading the text. I really like that baleful eye!

Continuing with our “Look to the Skies” theme, watch out for flying battleships!  John of Just Needs Varnish! painted a couple of 1/1200 scale aeronefs, which are “ships that fly using some form of gravity-resisting technology to stay airborne.”  The miniatures are produced by Brigade Models.*

Below is a Japanese Shinano class dreadnought. Nicely done and cute spotter plane too!

Japanese Flying Battleship Shinano class Just Needs Varnish

Check out John’s post if you want to see some pictures of the models before they were painted as well as his thoughts about building and modifying these models.  He also shows off some of his older aeronefs in his post as well. John also painted a Russian Poltava class dreadnought, pictured below.

Russian Poltava class dreadnought by John of Just Needs Varnish

Maybe we’ll see more aeronefs from John in the future.  He writes that he has “some lighter aeronefs to finish for these two fleets” and he also has the better part of a Chinese fleet done, and a French fleet to paint.  Let the 19th Century steampunk skies be filled with flying warships!

All of these aerial pictures makes me wonder: can aeronefs drop bombs on each other and the general landscape as well?

Russian Poltava class dreadnought by John of Just Needs Varnish aerial view

It pleases me to continue with the fortresses that can fly and things with wings, so next up is a nicely painted succubus by Dave Stone of Wargames Terrain Workshop. I like those wings by the way with the veins and such.

Dave reports that his demon miniature is about 70mm or 2.75 inches in height, which puts it into the ogre-sized category. Demons come in all shapes and sizes, especially given many of them are shape shifters.

Next up is the prolific Azazel of Azazel’s Bitz Box. He finished quite a passel of miniatures for the challenge. Where to start? How about something with wings such as his Ashardalon the Red Dragon, which he painted with Contrast paints, from the Wrath of Ashardalon board game.

Ashardalon the red dragon by Azazel left front view

Makes me think my friends and I should paint the miniatures from the D&D board games we play, though we probably won’t.

We’ll end the current aerial theme (but not Azazel’s contributions to our challenge — there is much more to come!) with his crashed Aquila lander from the Warhammer 40K 4th edition starter set. I’ve seen a lot of these in games over the years and this one is very nicely done.

Azazel's Aquila lander 01

Azazel writes in his blog that I “was not quite so enthusiastic” about the idea of the Eagle lander being a miniature of magnitude when we talked about it a couple of months ago. I have mostly forgotten the conversation but apparently I was willing to be mollified so long as “there was some kind of giant monster smashing through it.”

Yes, that sounds like me all right. I’m not sure why I was previously unenthusiastic since the lander fits the challenge as much as, say, a Rhino APC would. Probably part of a now forgotten master plan to get Azazel to showcase some of his monsters, which I favor. It worked because he included a “Kaiju shot with not one, but TWO giant monsters …” as you see in the picture above. We even get smaller bonus monsters too and kind of a Nurgle meets Tyranids meets Lovecraft thing. It is great when a plan comes together!

The two larger monsters in question from the “Kaiju shot” are Mudgullet the Froghemoth and Goremaw the Devourer, both from the Reaper Bones line. I’m leave it to the reader’s perspicacity to determine which is which!

Going back to the Wrath of Ashardalon board game for a moment, I quite like Azazel’s Rage Drake. I think this one would be a whole lot more intimidating when it is plunked down on the board than the unpainted ones I’ve seen when I’ve played the game myself with friends. I particularly like the light stripes on the neck.

He’s also painted an Otyugh, also from Wrath of Ashardalon, which jumped (or perhaps burrowed is way past) the queue “because ‘need it for the game.'” I have a soft spot for this monster because of a rather strange dungeon I ran back in the early ’80’s, which heavily featured these creatures. I won’t say any more about it here because I don’t want to digress.**

These four (air, water, earth, and fire) elementals are from the Temple of Elemental Evil D&D boardgame. Yep, they are bigger than a standard ogre!

We’ll cast Plane Shift and leave the world of Dungeons & Dragons for Zombicide, where Azazel’s Abominations can be found. They are certainly both colorful and corrupt, which is just how we like our zombies.

He also painted an Orc Abomination too. This one comes from “Black Plague’s standalone expansion, Green Horde.”

Azazel has been doing a lot of experiments with Contrast Paint lately and has been mostly “emphasizing how things have gone well.” These Trun Hunters from the Shadows of Brimstone board game, are according to Azazel, are “an example of when Contrast Paints combine with bad models to create … something not good.”

I won’t comment except to say while they probably won’t win the 2021 Golden Demon, they are certainly table top quality and fine for board games, where (at least with my crowd) the figures are usually unpainted. So this green-skinned trio has us beat, board game-wise at least.

We’ll end Azazel’s challenge contribution on a sort of virenslithic happy note with the mighty Mossbeard the Treeman. We’ve saved the largest for last here: Azazel reports that this is “the largest model I’ve painted to date.” I like all of the grass, moss and such; it really adds a lot to the model. Many of the people, who commented on his post, think so too and they aren’t wrong! Here is a little slideshow of this most magnitudinous of ents.

Next up is Steve of Dreadaxe Games and his Word Bearers Rhino. Our friendly Chaos Lord’s goal with this new addition to his painted forced was to “keep it in line with everything that I liked about the Chaos Vehicles: the spiked top sections, the grumpy gunner, the variety of gruesome trophies, etc.” As you can see Steve’s APC has lots of suitable, heretical bling. I wonder if that doom caster he’s got will still make it harder for people to shoot overwatch in the coming 9th edition 40K rules? I hope so!

Mcmattila of mcmattilaminis painted Mollog, of Mollog’s Mob from Warhammer Underworlds. Colorful and as usual, his painting is very good. I think that his miniature pictures could be used as art on some of the miniature boxes or in the army books. They are that polished. I particularly like the big, squishy toad and the dorsal mushrooms are none too shabby either.

Argentbadger, of The Bovine Overlord, completed a Chaos Knight War Dog in “deep red in honour of the Blood God.” With the giant melta arm and another melta on its back, as well as a nasty-looking chainsword arm, I don’t think I’d want to be sitting in a tank watching this thing as it scuttles my way. I thought it was a nice touch that Argentbadger used the head from a Juggernaut of Khorne kit, which fits these things nicely, both in look and in the canine spirit of the name. Besides melta, this dog’s got some teeth!

We’ll close the painting challenge with a visit to the world of Blood Bowl where Faust of Double Down Dice has added another ogre to his burgeoning roster of malcontents, murderers, and gridiron mavens of mayhem.

His human team can field one of these guys as a special player. If they are anything like trolls, which Faust assures us they are, then they are easily confused and will often just stand around on the pitch and do nothing, but as he goes on to reassure us, “the strength of an Ogre is nothing to scoff at, when they decide to work with you.”

Thank you very much to everyone who participated in this June-July challenge. It took me awhile to keep this round-up posted and all I can say on that front is I spent the last couple of months in the dark prince’s court within the nacreous cloud spire atop his Eidolon of Indolence. It was time well spent and now I am feeling the whole blog and painting thing again. I hope everyone is doing well and as always, “Paint On!”

* John’s ships remind me of a show I used to love when I was teenager called Star Blazers, complete with flying battleship.

** Back around 1980 or ’81 I wrote up an adventure for my friends where the boss was a Xorn with magical spells and very high intelligence. Its upper level minions were a bunch of Otyugh. The secret entrance to the Xorn’s inner sanctum, which was the interior of a huge geode, was beneath one of their enormous crap piles (mostly the accumulation of waste from slaves) through which the Otyughs had burrowed an elaborate network of rooms and passageways. One of the players coined the title, “Dungeon of Dung,” which stuck, though I originally named it the Fane of Feces. Perhaps if one of these days I decide to run some D&D, I’ll dig out this old chestnut and see how it stands up to the march of decades and my older (but hopefully) wiser eyes. That was pretty long-winded for a “I won’t comment” comment.

Completed Poxwalker Mob!

Let the plague bells ring!  Friends, I have at long last closed the books on my mob of twenty Dark Imperium poxwalkers with this round-up.  I started putting the wretches together in June 2017, when the boxed set came out, and now we come full circle to June 2020.  What a long, disease-ridden road (punctuated with both apathy and frenzied activity) it has been!

Twenty Poxwalkers June 10 2020

For the Grandfather!

My Dark Imperium poxwalker posts for this mob:

Although it took me three years to get the full mob painted, my poxwalkers have certainly distinguished themselves in battle, along with their running mates the plaguebearers, especially during that fruitful time of mid-2017 through 2018, when I was playing games of Warhammer 40K almost every week.

I’ve built up a pretty decent-sized force of minor Nurgle troops thus far.  Twenty plaguebearers with a couple of minor leader types, the poxwalkers (of course) and let’s not forget the semi-official mascots including Toad, Rusty the rust monster, and the bit box skeletal snake thingie.

So what’s next Nurgle-wise?  I have no shortage of projects to choose from, but the one that shines turgidly forth burbling out to be kicked back to the top of the painting heap is my long suffering daemon engine, Becky the Bloat Drone.  She has been abandoned not once but twice and maybe even thrice, though I’ve lost track so I am not sure about that.  We’ll have to see what we can do to remedy the situation once Frank’s Pig Demon is done.

Becky the Bloater WIP Ink Sketch 400 wide

Being a daemon engine ain’t easy.

Until next time, qapla’ and …

Paint On keeping fighting guy

 

Commissar Poxwalker #19 Completed

I finished Commissar Poxwalker #19 here before its counterpart, Khorne Flower Poxwalker #20, who is also a commissar, as chance would have it.*  The picture-taking got a little out of order but I’ve gotten that all sorted and can now present this (not quite) latest addition to my foetid forces.

Poxwalker #19 Front view June 9 2020
There wasn’t a lot of blister and pox highlighting to be done on this one, because of the greatcoat, so I thought I’d go for a fairly mild case of yellow mold.**  This time I was careful to spread the texture paste without pulling away the paste too much with my sculpting tool.  I wasn’t going for a bunch of little spiky bits like I got on my poxbringer’s arm.

I forget how I painted the mold this time, but it looks like I used some bright green, followed by bright yellow and then a glaze from maybe Waywatcher Green or perhaps Biel-Tan Green with a little satin finish.  I’ll have to try this again and write down what I did next time so I don’t forget in the time between completing the model and typing up a blog post.

Poxwalker #19 rear view June 9 2020

I did the dorsal tentacles and left arm with Flesh Tearers Red Contrast and Nuln Oil Gloss, then brightened them up with some thinned down Blood Angels Red Contrast followed by Evil Sun Scarlet.  I used Basilicanum Grey Contrast to emphasize the separations between the tentacles.  I find using contrast paint in this way easier than using washes because the former don’t flow all over the place so one can be a bit more targeted.

I’ve been having fun lately doing a little post-production with my pictures.***  So we’ll wrap up Commissar Poxwalker’s moment in the Verdigris Sun with a few of these sort of offerings.  Don’t mind Bits Box Skeletal Snake Thingie; I think it has spent so many years entombed in the sepulchral darkness of the game store bits box that it grabs any chance for attention it can get.  Truly, it is incredibly needy for a mindless undead.****
  

So that is it for this penultimate poxwalker post.  I’ll do one more of the whole crew and put paid to this playful party of putrescent perambulators.  I’m continuing to work on Frank’s Pig Demon, which I hope to have done before the end of June, since that is my planned offering for the Miniatures of Magnitude Painting Challenge.

Take care all.

Red Biohard clip art with circle around it 100 wide

* Or possesses the greatcoat of a commissar, which can be much the same thing at times.

** I had a bit of a chuckle reading what my poxbringer had to say about yellow mold almost two years ago now.  I had completely forgotten about our little chat.

*** If this continues I might have to break down and learn how to use Photoshop versus just fiddling around with the little paint program I’m currently fumbling around with.

**** For instance, Skeletal Snake is constantly reminding me that it “never got its own blog post and just got stuck in with some badly-painted poxwalkers like 30 years ago.”  Even though I’ve promised to use it in a D&D game someday and have given this pestiferous haunt a place as a token/marker/mascot in my forces, I still have to put up with its whining.  This is surely not what I expected when I began perusing forbidden tomes and conducting vile painting experiments.  Oh well, now it’s got me whining too.  Such is the hard life of a Necromantrix!

Birthday fit for a King!

I had another birthday not too long ago and it was a fun day.*  My family made me a sort of rectangular cake.  I was pretty impressed that it was five layers and it is always lovely to have a birthday cake that is handmade instead of something from the grocery store or bakery.  The candy bits were good too.  I don’t eat much in the way of candy these days so it was a welcome treat and I spent the evening and most of the next day dancing on the frosting edge of gluttony-induced sickness, like the Masque.

Birthday Cake June 2020

It was tasty too:  yellow cake with white frosting is my favorite.

Received some fun presents too.  On the hobby front, my husband, after classified consultations, duplicitous deceits, nebulous negotiations, and perplexing pacts, within and without the Dark Mechanicum, presented me with a Chaos Knight and a pair of baby knights!**

We spent a little time before the party doing a Social Distanced Birthday Hike.  We saw this fine, serpentine personage when we were crossing some railroad tracks.  It isn’t every day that you meet a talking snake so I dug out my cell phone, snapped this picture and went on our way as directed.***

I had never seen this species of snake before, but it didn’t look like the coral snakes I had encountered in the ’80’s when I lived in Texas.  (We’re living in the hills outside of Santa Cruz, California now.)  Once I got home and investigated the matter a little more, I learned that my loquacious friend was a California Mountain Kingsnake.****

California mountain kingsnake June 2020 talking

Not very friendly, really.

For next time I hope to post a work-in-progress picture of Frank’s Pig Demon that I’m trying to complete for the Miniatures of Magnitude painting challenge, which ends on July 3rd.  So far the challenge seems to be shaping up nicely with completed offerings by Azazel’s Bitz Box, Convert or Die, Dreadaxe Games, Just Needs Varnish!, and Scent of a Gamer.

Until next time, I hope everyone is well.

Balloon Clip Art 125 wide

* It is amazing how fast the years go by now.  I suspect it all is some sort of unasked for boon/blessing from Tzeentch or something in return for painting a bunch of lesser horrors back in 2017.

** I suspect that that my husband might have made plans within plans within some sort of overall master plan birthday present-wise.  I have been making vague, periodic noises, which probably won’t ever amount to anything, about “nurgling up” an imperial knight that has been sitting in his office closet for like five years now.  He has always grumbled about this being a grave insult to both (his beloved) Ultramarines and Questor Imperialis House Wycoff.  So maybe he’s trying to redirect and outsmart me?  If so, color me outsmarted and happily so!

*** I don’t like to stress out wild animals by lingering around them or picking them up, so we moved on fairly quickly.

**** I received a post about “Degenerate Serpentfolk” right in the middle of typing up this little spiel about my friend the kingsnake.  I wonder if this is some sort of cryptic message from the Ruinous Powers that I need to include some more snakes (other than just this lone representative) in my coterie?

 

 

Poxwalker #20 (with a Khorne Flower?)

So I’m seeing the light at the end of purulent tunnel, as it were, poxwalker-wise with this latest offering.  I had plans to go with a similar orange type flesh that I was so pleased with on the last one, but as seems to so often be the case with my diseased quasi-zombies when I do have a plan it seldom comes off as planned.

Poxwalker #20 Front dark view

I had a little extra green stuff on hand (I’m guessing) the year or two ago when I glopped a candle onto its horn.  For once I wasn’t trying to hide a broken off tip, which seems to have become pretty common for me over the last few years.*  Perhaps I need to ease off a point or two on the Slaanesh-based energy drinks that cause my hands to shake and roil (temporarily) with sneering finger tentacles?

The candle itself was easy enough to paint.  White primer, sepia wash, off-white layer and then a bit of brighter white toward the top near the flame.  For the flame, I used the recipe from White Dwarf #57 (February 2015) entitled “Khorne’s Wrath.”  Overall I’m pleased but I do think I’ll be more careful with the Nuln Oil next time.  I’m happy with how the flame looks from the back but less so from the front.  I made several unsuccessful attempts to make myself happier with the front of the flame before finally giving up before I made things worse since I didn’t want to  have to go over the flame with Ceramite White and do it over again.

Poxwalker #20 Rear dark view

Using a recipe from a publication dedicated to Khorne is probably where I went wrong, and I should have been on my guard when I went for orange flesh and ended up with red.**  Well, I had put some green stuff on my poxwalker’s shoulder with the idea of it looking like wax that had dripped down from its horn candle.  Seemed like a good idea at the time but I wasn’t satisfied with how I executed it.  So I thought of trying something a little different and busted out my jar of Golden’s fiber paste.

I started out with the idea of creating some textured flesh or perhaps a slightly sticky or spiky area like the yellow mold on my poxbringer.  Imagine my surprise when I slapped on some of this paste, drew it out a bit with my sculpting tool and ended up with what you see below!

I let my creation dry overnight, closed my eyes and wondered on the festering mysteries of the Grandfather’s Garden.  The next day, when I was brushing some primer on this new doodad, a voice screeched in my mind.  It resonated somewhere between a broken concertina and claws rasping over a blackboard.  How charming.

“‘Nurgle?  Nurgle!  Vile mortal, you have decapitated a bud from the sanguine Hothouse of Khorne!  You are without a doubt both stupid, ugly, and a stinking fleshbag whose crumbling, rotted skull is not fit for Khorne’s cesspit much less His Throne!”

“Isn’t that three things, young demon?”

“SSSSSCCCCCREEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!”

“SCREEE!”

“Get not thine nether regions in a complete twist young firebrand, for as the Burning Books sayeth, ‘He cares not from whence the sap flows so long that it flows!'” I countered.  It all went downhill from there as it so often does when treating with the Ruinous Powers.  C’est la vie.

Poxwalker #20 Vignette Portrait

Hope I got Commissar Poxwalker’s best side.

Anyway, some sharp-eyed reader might be wondering how in Tzeentch’s name we went from poxwalker #18 to poxwalker #20.  Well, I did get #19 done, but I’m not happy with the pictures I took so I’m going to take more over the weekend and will post them soon.  It’ll be happy times indeed when I do for then and only then will I be able to close the books on my Dark Imperium poxwalkers, which I started so long ago now.***

khorne20bullet20point20graphic2002_zpsh7cfhuus

* There was the broken tip that I turned into a tentacle spike on poxwalker #18.  Then there was the plaguebearer with a banner, and of course who can forget Maggotmouth’s nameless friend (from early 2018) whose broken horn I ended up sharpening like a pencil?

** On the other hand, I’m sure this guy and these people approve!

*** June 2017.

April 2020 “Paint the Crap You Already Own!” Painting Challenge Round-up (Part 2 of 2)

Welcome to second half of the April 2020 Paint the Crap You Already Own! painting challenge.  Part One of this painting challenge round-up can be found here.

John at Just Needs Varnish French HQ looking at map small filler art ink sketch effect

Yes, here!

First up is John’s Franco-Prussian War marching Prussian infantry, currently on parade from Just Needs Varnish!.  John mentioned that this “marching unit is a bit different from the others I’ve painted.”  He makes a good point.  Now that I think about it, I haven’t seen many marching units like this one either on the tabletop.  Plenty of units at attention or in action, of course, but not marching.

These figures are from “the Emhar plastic 1:72 FPW Prussian Infantry set,” and the officer is “a metal figure from Hagen Miniatures.”

John at Just Needs Varnish Marching Prussian Infantry

Looking good but that private in the back and fourth in from the left needs to get back in step!

John mentions that the “Prussian coats are described as black-grey,” and thus are lighter than the real thing.  You can read more about what he has to say on the issue here if you’d like.  Whatever the case, I think they would look good.

He also painted some Prussian field artillery to go along with his infantry.  All of the figures in the gun battery below “are from the B&B Miniatures 20mm FPW range.”  In games, when the gun is being moved, John places it on the lengthened base “behind its limber.”

John at Just Needs Varnish Prussian field gun with crew and limber

I like how that one wheel is sunk a little into the mud.  (Vallejo Flat Brown for the horses.)

Below we have a French Mitrailleuse team.  John reports that “In English, Mitrailleuse is the name given to the first machine gun in French service in the Franco-Prussian War, the Reffy Mitrailleuse.”  John also has a couple of interesting videos showing how the Montigny (1863) and Reffy (1867) versions of the Mitrailleuse operated.

John at Just Needs Varnish French Mitrailleuse Team

French mitrailleuse (machine gun) team.  John says this looks more like the Montigny version.

The story behind this Headquarters base of a “French senior officer conferring with one of his aides,” gave me quite a chuckle when John wrote the officer was “wondering why he hasn’t got a map of France.”  Apparently the French expected that they would be invading Germany and consequently didn’t have maps of France.  Turns out the Prussians had “tourist maps of France” aplenty.  Either way doesn’t exactly sound ideal!

John at Just Needs Varnish French HQ looking at map

Face it, monsieur, we’re lost … again!

Dave of Faith&Steel is working on increasing his Chinese Bolt Action forces and toward that worthy end completed a GAZ jeep.  The model is produced by Warlord Games.  I had never heard of these vehicles before so I poked around and learned there were several versions.  (At first glance I thought it was one of these but the nose and fenders were wrong.)  I asked Dave which version he thought his miniature was and he believed it was a GAZ-67B.

Faith and Steel GAZ Jeep front view

Snazzy sunglasses!

According to Wikipedia, “GAZ” stands for Gorkovsky Avtomobilny Zavod, which translates to Gorky Automobile Plant.  The GAZ-64 was developed “during the 1940 war between the Soviet Union and Finland,” and used “commerically available parts already available in the Soviet Union.”

Improvements made to the GAZ-67 over the earlier GAZ-64 included, among other things, a stronger frame, wider wheel base and greater fuel capacity.  This newer version was first produced in September 1943 with the B-series entering production as a replacement in January 1944.

Many people paint Blood Bowl players/combatants, but this month Dave from Scent of a Gamer presents something for the teams to fight over:  four trophies!  They are good sized as trophies go and to illustrate this Dave includes a couple of players for scale.

Scent of a Gamer Blood Blowl Trophies

See pictures below for each trophy’s title.

The trophies have some fun lore associated with them.  When I asked David about it he wrote that each of these trophies is awarded for a separate, major contest with the Blood Bowl being “the richest tournament which awards players a finalist medal.”  My favorite is the Chaos Cup (obviously) because of the “special interest” the Chaos Gods take in the tournament, resulting in random mutations and the like, as well as innovations such as prize money being determined randomly.  (“Yes, Gruncher, we only took second place but we got ALL the money!”)

David “decided to stick as close as possible to the original art in the 1993 Blood Bowl box.”  The pictures below show each trophy next to their original art.  I think he did a good job with that and a nice job painting them as well.

Maenoferren22 of Bogenwald worked on cavalry again this month but this time instead of Lustria he rides into Japan, possibly during (by the looks of things) the Sengoku period, which was a long period of civil war.

I always wondered about those flags on their backs or sashimono.  They look pretty cool in those old movies I used to watch many years ago (back when James Clavell’s novel, Shogun was popular) and I always assumed they had to do with identification and unit cohesion.  Turns out I wasn’t far wrong.

Bogenwald Samurai Cavalry

Plus they also provide aspiring tabletop shoguns scope for painting because Maenoferren22 wrote that he spent a fair amount of time painting the mon (emblems) on the sashimono and he had to 3D print them separately as well.  With posts such as I Hate Sashimono,” and Maeno’s general sashimono-based efforts here and here, it is a good thing they add a lot of color and interest to miniatures as well as fun to old timey war movies because otherwise I’d have to say there were an awful lot of trouble.  Fortunately it turns out they are worth it.

Maeno’s force certainly is colorful and there are quite a lot of them now.  They’ll present quite a spectacle and instill the requisite awe and fear in his enemy’s hearts on the battlefield.

Bogenwald Japanese Force

Argentbadger of The Bovine Overlord continues to expand his painted Warmachine collection and this month he has painted Anastasia Di Bray of the Mercenaries faction.  Argent reports that she is “basically a spy in the stories and her game rules involve ambush deployment and a highly amusing (if hard to pull off) special rule,” that seems to involve creeping up to the enemy warcaster/leader-type such that her forces can take advantage of the distraction to move into “punch them to death” range.

This seems a highly desirable thing to do and I have to say that I’d make sure Anastasia (or anyone else who could pull off a plan like that) got paid on time and was happy with her mercenary contract.  Wouldn’t want to look up one day and find out the hard way she’d gone over to the enemy!

Argent used “dark, naturalistic colours” for this miniature because it fit into the idea of Anastasia being sneaky.  He also pointed out that he liked the “fairly old” and “understated” pose versus the probable newer sculpt that would have her “balanced precariously on a rock throwing knives around like confetti.”  I agree and think that companies often overdo this, especially with rank-and-file types.  Heck, even though I don’t play Warmachine I find myself wanting this miniature because I think it would be useful for Dungeons & Dragons and other games.

Wudugast of Convert or Die! apparently has a love-hate relationship with the Adeptus Mechanicus.  Here we have two Skitarii rangers, one of which he started years ago, abandoned the project, then finished him for the challenge; the other he recently knocked out in about ninety minutes.

Convert or Die Two Skitarii Rangers

Can you tell which is which?  I think they both look great.

I said “love-hate” because Wudugast wrote that he has “a long standing love for the Adeptus Mechanicus, dating back to long before there was a range of models available for them,” but that until now he had “never painted a single model from the range,” and he found painting his first ranger an exercise in “frustration and irritation,” though he did much better sanity-wise with the second.  I’m glad because I’d very much like to see more Adeptus Mechanicus stuff from the mighty Wudugast!

What game doesn’t need more “hard-done-by civilians” to populate its burgeoning Necromunda hives?  Wudu is quite right to complain that with all of the xenos, cultists, gangs and such, no one is “here to do a day’s work.  They just seem to think that the corroded pipes, pools of toxic gunk and ominous piles of skulls just happen by magic.”  Complain no longer for here are some “Mechanics” produced by C-P Models ready to put in a hard day’s work.

Well, they used to be mechanics until Convert or Die’s chief, um, “converter” got his multifarious and (perhaps) charmingly misshaped paws on them.  He also used “heads from Anvil Industry and various Games Workshop gubbins.”  The spherical drone was “kitbashed entirely out of odds and ends” and almost ended back in the bits box junk pile until Wudugast decided his new workmen might make use of it.

Convert or Die Necromunda civilians three and drone

I wonder if that drone perhaps needs a candle?

Wudugast also wanted to experiment with “a new and easier way to paint orange.”  For these chaps he base coated with Jokaero Orange, followed by Gryph-Hound Orange Contrast, ending with a highlight of Jokaero Orange and then Fire Dragon Bright.  Looks pretty good to me.  Might have to try this recipe out.  Certainly sounds easy enough.

On a side note, I mentioned to Wudu that I liked the candles and he told me they came from the Cawdor kit.  Fancy!

Here are the original C-P Models mechanics in case you were wondering:

Convert or Die Mechanics models C-P Models

The think the guy on the left is pissed about his errant pile of skulls.

Head swaps, candles, sinister drone assistants and the like might not be ideal working conditions/fringe benefits, but at least they are better off than these four unfortunates below.  If you would like to see Wudugast’s completed forty poxwalker-strong mob (I manually counted them in the picture), with all of his various conversions, sometimes subtle but always delightful, you can find them here.

We continue our tour of Necromunda with Alex’s (of Leadballoony) D’onne ‘Mad D’onna’ Ultanti miniature he “originally intended to complete” a couple of years ago, again for his yearly Fembruary painting challenge.  Happily, Alex finally managed to gather his courage and complete the miniature for this little challenge.

Leadballoony D'onne Ultani front view

Forget the weaponry, the hair alone puts D’onne firmly into the elite category.

I suspect D’onne would be the sort of person our aforementioned mechanics would complain about, what with her tragic upbringing, her time in and out of various underhive gangs, and not having the inclination what with being on the run and all, to admire their cunning fashioned piles of skulls and working, not-leaking-too-badly plumbing. 

Given her penchant for the plasma pistol and table manners (one wonders if a fish fork is the correct utensil for taking out someone’s eye at a formal dinner … at least in polite society?) I imagine said mechanics would do well to keep their opinions firmly to themselves.  

Alex based his paint scheme for D’onne from the book, Survival Instinct, by Andy Chambers.  The cover art was done by Clint Langley.  He (Alex not Andy or Clint) talks about some of the challenges of painting the miniature, such as fishnets, and I have to agree that sounds hard.  Well done, Alex, for finally getting D’onne finished and not having to endure another year of her sending you threatening, faux Morse code-based messages from your bits box by cunningly revving her (nuclear powered?) chainsword, demanding you get her painted for Fembruary 2021.  Now you can have some other miniature threaten you instead!

Candore Et Labore Tree person bust ink sketch effect clip art

Eric of Candore Et Labore certainly was productive for the month of April, which heralded (besides finishing 26 models) the completion of Eric’s first (five months in the making) diorama.  Here we have a scene near the cliffs of Dover, very likely during the Battle of Britain.  Note that the decals on the German aircraft, painted in 1940 colors, represent the 109 flown by Luftwaffe ace, Feldwebel Heinz Bär.

Candore Et Labore Spitfire and Me 109 diorama

1/72 scale German Bf 109 E-3 and British Spitfire Mk I.a.

Some of the “many firsts” for Eric in his diorama is “modeling water using toilet paper, using an airbrush to paint a realistic model and camouflage and making smoke/fire from cotton balls.”  I think he did a great job and this dogfight alone would have been a good month’s work, in my estimation, but Eric was far from done yet.

From England we journey to a scratch-built patch of North Africa where Eric has emplaced a flak gun.  I like how this turned out, particularly the weathering on the gun shield.  The sandbags where a nice touch too, as well as the verisimilitude in locating the emplacement in what seems a tactically sound area.  The picture gives the sense that the area is a slight depression.  The ridge on the right provides good cover and concealment on that side and the Germans have placed some sand bags where they would do some good for the riflemen.  Perhaps they have a machine gun back there somewhere they could bring up if needed?

Candore Et Labore German flak gun diorama

This Flugabwehrkanone is from Tamiya’s “Siege of Tobruk” set in 1/48 scale.

Eric fired up his printer and completed some alien plants.  His idea was to paint them up fast with “wild colors,” and to that end Eric “used only craft store paints straight from the battle.”  (Note the guardsman in the bottom right picture put in for scale.)

Eric also printed out and painted a Necromunda loader and a “little critter” that reminds me of a Tarantula sentry gun with twin assault cannons.  (I think I have one with heavy bolters eternally lost somewhere in my pile of plastic.)  He also got an interesting bit of terrain done that looks like it could be some sort of turbine or field generator.

Finally, Eric painted two busts that he “had printed months ago.”  The plant person on the left is “baby Groot,” and the idea was to “put a small cactus in his head,” which is hollow like a planter, and present Baby Groot Cactus Head as a present for his wife’s birthday.  Alas, with the stores closed down he couldn’t make the cactus happen, but he did also paint up a plague doctor bust.  Nice!

Mark, of Man of Tin, inspired by a 1987 article by Stuart Asquith, decided to open up his blue box of drawers that has done good service by helping “preserve a small core of randomly painted and unpainted figures from my gaming in the 1980s throughout many house moves.”

He has taken advantage of his extra hobby time to finish a bunch of figures and units that have been sitting around for nearly 40 years.  Mark got a lot of work done and I’m sure there is much more space in his blue box to build up to another big painting project by 2060 or so!

Man of Tin Peter Laing 15mm ECW unit with white and gray flag

Peter Laing 15mm English Civil War pikemen complete at last.

In addition to the Blue Box Figures, Mark also had another box where he stored “random figures from job lots,” that he acquired in his quest for more Peter Laing figures.  Some of scrapped metal found new life as european “ImagiNations ‘Forgotten Minor States,'” such as the Volunteer Militia.  One wonders what the symbol on their flag is supposed to represent?

Man of Tin FMS unit Volunteer Militia of Thyer Brigadia

Volunteer Militia of Thyer Brigadia unit.

Some “Confederates, generic rebels or Revolutionary forces” made up from “unpainted scrap American Civil War type figures from various makers in mixed uniforms.”  Given its pedigree, it seems to me like this unit ought to get some sort of bonus in games when fielded as irregulars, militia, etc.

Man of Tin generic Confederates rebels revolutionary forces unit

“They have improvised themselves a dramatic Revolutionary flag.”

The cannon is “from the Napoleonic Risk board game served by a crew made from “broken figures.”

Man of Tin cannon and crew from the Napoleonic Risk game

Artillery support, perhaps, for our revolutionary types above?

Besides, revolutionaries, Mark also found (and patched up) pirate types a plenty in his magic Blue Box of Insurrection. I think he has enough miniatures between these guys and some of the others to put on a pretty respectable Treasure Island game.

Man of Tin 15mm Pirates with muskets and blunderbusses

Forgotten Minor States: 15mm pirates with muskets and blunderbusses.

Man of Tin 15mm Pirates with muskets and blunderbusses

More 15mm pirates (or brigands perhaps) with long pistols.

These chaps below in white shirts could fill many roles.  Guerrillas, colonists, sailors pressed into service by the pirates perhaps?

Man of Tin Guerillas or sailor looking types in white shirts with muskets or rifles

Guerillas or sailors with muskets or rifles (and a cannon!).

Mark also found a lot of 15mm “Tricorne figures with short muskets or carbines.”  He painted them to be “practical Redcoats roughing it in the forest wilds or along the cliffs and coast searching for Natives or Wreckers.”  Worthy opponents for the revolutionaries and pirates and as Mark points out could be useful for 18th Century Close Wars types of conflicts “in the forests of America.”

Mark completed a couple of dioramas, in addition to his newly refurbished 1980’s 15mm forces.  Here we have a “border watchtower in one of the forgotten minor states.”

Man of Tin Border Watchtower hex diorama

The hexes look good and a board of these would make for a very playable game.

Man of Tin Border Watchtower hex diorama view from back

This picture makes me want to play either a Command & Colors game or Muskets & Tomahawks.

Finally, Mark put together a “portable port” that was (in part) “inspired by finding a Murray King postcard of Cornish Wreckers” when he was “on a seaside trip a year or two ago.”

Man of Tin Portable Port

“Redcoats!  Smugglers!  Wreckers!”  Note the postcard in back.

The lighthouse and warehouses came from a “wooden buildings from Christmas” project.  The Martello tower has a swiveling cannon that Mark is very proud of.  He writes more about the these fortifications and how he made his here.  A spoiler:  it involves some “mini crumble puddings” containers.

Miko, of Dawn of the Lead, offers up a “mixed selection” of six miniatures he painted this month.  I think they are all very nicely painted and I like the background he used for them too.

The fellow below on the left is Black Cat Bases’s metal pirate surgeon, who provides many opportunities for the Carpenter to make a wooden limb.”  The pirate is Esmerelda II from Black Scorpion Miniatures.  Let’s hope a wooden limb isn’t in her future anytime soon!

Dawn of the Lead Barber Surgeon and Esmerelda

Like the glasses and the pirates’s hat & hair.

The monkey with the hat is another miniature from Black Scorpion.  (I think Mikko did a much better job of painting his than the one on the company website for what it is worth.)  Originally, as I pointed out in the comments to his post, I thought the miniature was a “dwarf anthro-donkey swashbuckler with an outrageously oversized hat,” but nope, it’s a monkey.

The monkey on the barrel was a “3d print from Depths of Savage Atoll.”  Speaking of barrels, Mikko did some more you can check out here.

Dawn of the Lead pair of monkeys

Another great hat.

The pirate on the left, with the raised sword, is a “custom Hero Forge piece” who Mikko named Smith of Bristol.  The inspiration for the name comes from a song by the Dubliners, and “tells the story of a daring pirate who goes around a-plunderin’ and a-robbin’ before finally being killed by a Spanish bullet.”  If you want to listen to the song, Mikko put a Youtube link in his blog post.

The last miniature is Tigl Uilenspiegel (or Till Owlglass), who “is a 16th (or possibly 15th or even earlier) century trickster figure,” and a rather odd fellow indeed.  Nice job with this one:  I really like the shading of the skin and the choice of colors for his clothes.

Dawn of the Lead Smith of Bristol and Till Owlglass

Finally, we wrap up our April painting challenge with my small contribution:  a bugbear and two poxwalkers, #18 and #19.  I liked how the flesh on “Somewhat Orange Poxwalker” came out so I might do something similar with the flesh on #20, which is the second of the great coat zombies.  (I saved the ones I wanted to paint the least until last.)

Bugbear and Poxwalker #18 and #19 for 12 Months of Hobby Painting Challenge at Painting in the Dark by Warbringer April 30 2020

Only one more poxwalker to go and I’ll have finally finished my Dark Imperium zombies.

Thank you very much again to everyone who participated in this, my second painting challenge.  If I left you out, please let me know and I’ll rectify the situation pronto.  If you haven’t seen Part One of this challenge, you can check it out here.

I apparently haven’t had enough of running painting challenges yet, so if you enjoyed this one and want more, check out the Sixty Day Miniatures of Magnitude Painting Challenge, which ends on July 3rd.

Take care, thank you for reading … and Paint On!

Fight On guy

 

Sixty Day Miniatures of Magnitude Painting Challenge! (May-June 2020)

Time for another painting challenge!  This time the idea is to paint at least one model that represents a creature, machine or terrain piece that is on the larger side.  Aircraft, daemon engines, tanks, giants, trains, cavewomen riding mammoths, ships, and beasts that are great, writhing masses of tentacles, eyes, and maws that tumbled down from the stars or crawled up out of the sewer all will find a home in this challenge.

(Note that if you click on the pictures,  they will take you to the artists’ websites.  I’ve included some examples below of projects that would work for this challenge.)

Part of “Clean Oceans” mural on Mission Street in Santa Cruz, California

Rules of the Challenge

  • The challenge closes on July 3rd, 2020 at midnight (last place on Earth).  The project must be completed, but if you can’t get your pictures posted by that date, it is fine.  Just post them as soon as you can.
  • Models must represent a creature at least the size of an ogre or small giant.  Machines must represent something that is at least as large as a medium-sized armored vehicle or single-seat aircraft.
  • Terrain pieces and dioramas are also welcome.  (See examples below.)
  • Any scale is welcome.  The miniatures can be small but have to represent things that would be large at 1:1 scale.  Also, there is nothing to say it has to be a miniature.  If you want to paint a mural, put a coat of paint on your house, refinish a good-sized piece of furniture, those would all count too as long as it is a painting or staining project.
  • Projects can be works in progress at the start of the challenge or you can begin something new.
  • You can complete one model or as many as you want.  Basing is great, but is optional.
  • Questions, comments, ideas?  Let me know in the comments.

If you paint small models during the challenge that would strongly fit thematically with your larger miniature, you can include them in a group shot.  For example, if Azazel painted an APC, like the one pictured below, and also painted some suitable space marine passengers to go along with it, he could include the marines in the group shot.

001001 Citadel Rhino Plague Marines Iron Warriors

Rhino APC and space marine rides by Azazel of Azazel’s Bitz Box.

Dioramas are also welcome for the challenge.  In these cases the whole is greater than the sum of its parts so you are not required to include a large creature or dominating terrain feature, although you may.  Pat included a good-sized wall in his “Desert Attack,” but the diorama would have qualified for the challenge without the wall because there is plenty going on here without it!

“Desert Attack” by the eponymous Pat of Pat’s 1:72 Military Diorama’s

A single building will qualify for this painting challenge.  Dave built a Wells Fargo Way Station as part of of diorama, but the building alone would qualify too.  As you can see, he went to the effort to model the inside as well.  (Click on the image to see the outside of his building and the overall diorama.)

Inside of Wells Fargo Way Station by Dave at The Imperfect Modeller.

Wudugast’s rat-ogre and its slightly smaller friend would both qualify for the challenge.  If he painted the ratman, with the spiked club and shield, on the far right during the challenge, it would fit thematically with the others and he could include it in a group shot (like the one below) if he wanted.

Stormfiend Skaven Wudugast ConvertOrDie (9)

Wudugast’s “rat-ogre” (left) and friends from Convert or Die.

Aircraft, like this representation from WWI by John, could fly into the challenge.  Any sizable machine or vehicle from any historical period as well as from milieus that only exist in the imagination are fair game.

2017_0716_15482000

Amercom Albatros D.V in “Airforce, One” by John of Just Needs Varnish!

Miniatures that represent towering statues or impressive golems that might guard forgotten ruins or await orders from a dread magician are appropriate …

Stone Golem by The Introverted Hermit

… as are mighty warriors (reptilian and otherwise) riding fearsome dinosaurs!

Scar Veteran riding a repurposed Allosaurus by Maenoferren22 of Bogenwald.

Trolls can come in many shapes and sizes and fortunately a lot of them can stand eye to eye with an ogre.  Some have interesting professions and hobbies too, such as playing in death sports, football leagues, or both at the same time.

My friend, Dave’s, troll and accompanying goblin cheerleader.

As for me, I hope to finally finish a pig demon-looking thing that a friend asked me to paint for him so long ago now that he apparently forgot I still had the miniature.  Heck, I forgot about the pig demon too until I happened to find it when I was organizing my hobby room/office.  So this challenge will push me to put pig demon toward the top of my painting queue and get it back into my friend’s hands before the end of the Aquarian Age!

With then still WIP poxwalker #18 to demonstrate scale.

The pig demon is my first priority, but maybe I can squeeze in Becky the Bloat Drone here too.  If so, my post-Heresy Death Guard forces will wax mighty indeed comprising this daemon engine and a full 20 zombie squad (hopefully) of poxwalkers.  Let the galaxy tremble!

Becky: Failing painting challenges since 2017!

After this painting challenge ends, I’m going to take July off from running painting challenges. Azazel has written that he might be doing a Jewel in July challenge for 2020 and if he does I’ll be painting for that.

Until next time paint on!

 

Fight On! From D&D Vol 3: The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures ...

 

Somewhat Orange Poxwalker #18 Finished

I finished Work-in-Progress (Nurgle Alert!) Poxwalker #18 the other day so MAGPPXWLKER-XVII has a special friend now.*  Despite my glacial pace, I’m currently in real danger of actually finishing up the Dark Imperium contagion-zombie mob.**  Whatever happens, I’ve completed a little “crap I already own” for the April painting challenge and I’m feeling pretty good about that!

Toad and I sort of like how this picture came out.

I started work on this poxwalker a long time ago and managed to drop it on the floor during one of my painting sessions.  This broke the tip off the large, overhead tentacle.  I set the miniature aside, possibly in disgust, and forgot about it for a year or so.  When I got back to work on it again, I had completely forgotten about the broken tentacle tip until I chanced to notice it once more.  As unpleasant surprises go, it was the gift that kept on giving!

I thought about maybe trying to whittle the offending appendage down a bit or repairing it with green stuff.  In the end I decided to rummage through my bits and see if I could make lemonade out of rotten lemons.  After several false tries (I really wish the hook had worked out) I ended up cutting a spear point-looking thing off the end of a chain bit from an old chaos space marine biker sprue and affixing it as you see here.

Hanging out, comparing mechanical arms probably, with #17.

I forget exactly how I painted the tentacles on #18, but I think I started out as I usually do with some Agrax Earthshade and maybe some Athonian Camoshade and/or thinned down Nuln Oil.  What I did do differently was after the washes I applied several layers of Skeletal Horde Contrast.  Then I went to do some tentacle highlight work, like I did on #17, when I realized that I didn’t really need to.  I could have but the washes in conjunction with the contrast paint brought the brown tentacles to a state that I was satisfied with for some random zombie.  As a final step, I used some Basilicanum Grey Contrast in the recesses between the tentacles.

Death Guard Symbol 125 wide

The lighter red ventral tentacles were painted with Blood Angels Red Contrast and then highlighted with various shades of red up through Wild Rider Red.  Then I tied them together with a mix of Blood for the Blood God, Lahmian Medium and old Baal Red I still have hanging around.

The darker ventral tentacle was painted with Flesh Tearers Red Contrast and then washed with Glossy Nuln Oil.  For the ventral area in general I used more Glossy Nuln Oil to impart some shine to the recessed areas and Minitaire Satin Coat where I wanted shine but didn’t want to add more color.

Might have to try Wudugast’s blue maggots on Poxwalker #20 perhaps.

I haven’t quite decided what else I want to finish this month.  I could go for broke and perhaps finish Poxwalker #19, though I also have a trio of Etsy bugbears with maces and shields that I quite favor too.  So many choices and the challenge deadline of May 3rd will be here before you know it.  I’ll have to decide soon.

Biohard clip art with circle around it 100 wide

* Perhaps a good, Death Guard name for the latest addition to my Indolent Forces might be Mechanical Arm that Works Kind of Crappily Somewhat Orange Poxwalker #18 or (MAWKCSOPXWLKR-XVIII)?  What it lacks in clarity I think it makes up for in pedantry.

** I put the Dark Imperium primaris space marines versus Death Guard boxed set on pre-order and picked it up the day it released in mid-2017.  I then immediately put together and started painting the poxwalkers, but got distracted by plaguebearers.  (I was assured by several people this can happen to anyone.)  I finished the first two poxwalkers in early September 2017.  Given that I’ve not only finished #18 but have actually started eyeing #19, there is a real chance I might actually finish the full mob of 20 within the next three years!  Not too shabby.

I’ll probably paint the six easy-to-build poxwalkers too at some point (I love the idea of a grenade flail!), but I wonder if I should even bother with the 150 or so more I have that people have given me over the years or sold to me for a nominal sum like, “Here’s 20 of these useless dudes I’ll never use; buy me a Coke or something?”

April 2020 “Paint the Crap You Already Own!” Painting and Hobby Challenge

My first painting challenge, March Might & Magic, is wrapping up on April 3rd, so I thought I’d announce a new painting challenge for this month:  Paint the Crap You Already Own!*  The idea is simple.  You can paint anything you want so long as you owned it before April 1, 2020.

Also, as a Hobby Challenge, you don’t have to confine yourself to painting models.  For example, you can finish a short story, poem, write a roleplaying game adventure, craft a mandala, paint a picture, post a Youtube video, complete a needlepoint project, finishing putting together a swing set out in your backyard, etc.  Pretty much anything fun or hobby-oriented that you started before April 1st.

Always good advice! 🙂

Rules of the Challenge

  • Models for this challenge must be ones you owned before April 1, 2020.
  • Before pictures are great, and I’ll use them for updates, but they are not required.  We’re on the honor system here.
  • If your project doesn’t involve painting models, you must have started work on it before April 1, 2020.
  • The challenge closes on May 3rd, 2020 at midnight (your local time).  If you can’t get your pictures posted by that date, it is fine.  Just post them as soon as you can.
  • You can complete one model for this challenge or as many as you want.  Basing is great, but is optional.
  • Models and projects you feature in other challenges are welcome here too.
  • You can join in, and add more models at any time as the month goes along.
  • Models from any company, range, time period, scale, etc. are welcome.
  • Questions and/or ideas?  Let me know in the comments.

Pioneer’s Cabin Diorama by Dave of The Imperfect Modeller.

Painting an entire diorama is certainly a worthy project and who doesn’t love a fully painted tank?

Panzerkampfwagen VI, Pattern Tintenfisch, from Sir John’s Just Needs Varnish!

Of course some good, old-fashioned space marines are always welcome.  One or a whole squad.  (Wretched, Gollum-looking person peering out of a hole optional.)

My friend, Daniel’s, Deathwing terminators from a March 2017 game.

Like I said, a project doesn’t have to be painting miniatures to have a place in this April challenge.  Something like this map I made using Campaign Cartographer software or one drawn by hand would find a welcome home here.

Might be fun to run a Fantasy-meets-Old West mini-campaign using my little map?

Learn the rules for a board game, play a game and then report your thoughts or review the game.

From review of Tiny Epic Galaxies game by Justin of The Solo Meeple.

Carve some pumpkins, perhaps?**

If  you don’t want to paint a picture, play a game, paint a model and making videos is lame … then when all else fails bake a Cthulhu pie!

Once again, “In his pie at R’lyeh, dead Cthulhu dreams for (drowns in?) whipped cream.”

Tree Symbol Clip Art

* This being April 1st, I was going to put up an April Fool’s challenge that for the month you could paint your entire backlog of unpainted models, but decided maybe to save that for next year.

** Ensorcelling said pumpkin(s) as containers for the bewitched life forces of extinct but somehow still nascent beings of pure song is entirely optional and probably beyond the scope of this hobby challenge.