The Lost Librarian’s Grave horror and dark, short story anthology now available on Amazon as an ebook

I am happy to say that the horror and dark fiction anthology I’ve been working on some quite some time went live on Amazon last night as an ebook. Besides being available for purchase, you can read it for free if you have Kindle Unlimited.

Buy the ebook on Amazon for $4.99 or read for free with Kindle Unlimited.

We’ll be releasing the paperback version of The Lost Librarian’s Grave later in October.

When I put together the table of contents I got to thinking about how people read anthologies. I know some people like to start at the beginning and read straight through to the end.

The traditional table of contents, which I put up a preview of here, caters to that way of doing things. It also has, for me anyway, a comforting feel of how I’m using to seeing books.

Some readers (me among them) like to skip around a collection of stories and read a short one here, a long one there, maybe that one with the weird exorcist or the disgruntled librarian who gets hectored by gargoyles.

For people like me, I grouped the stories (and four poems) under various headings. Some of the stories could have gone under multiple headings. For example, “Ocular” could have just as easily been a “strange adventure” but I liked “An Eye for an Eye” because of the play on words.

One thing I like about checking out books on Amazon is their “Look Inside” feature where they let you preview about 10% of a book. The Lost Librarian’s Grave is a pretty big book, so 10% ends up being a pretty goodly chunk of reading. I put the stories in bold text below that one can read in their entirety through Amazon’s preview.

I tried to pick three that were pretty different from each other in tone and style as well as plot to highlight the variety I did my best to bring to the collection.

Tomorrow I think I’m going to take a much-needed day off from working on the book, and then get the wheels turning again on Monday for putting together the paperback, which will start with giving my existing ebook cover a spine and a back page.

Hope everyone is having a good weekend.

Witches, Magicians, and Sorcery

  • “Medusa’s Mirror” by Paul L. Bates
  • “Snake and Sinew, Flame and Bone” by Amanda Cecelia Lang
  • “The Artist” by Mike Murphy
  • “The Clearing” by Helen Power
  • “The Maze of Moonlight and Mirrors” by Gerri Leen (poem)

The Dead, the Mad, and the Terrified

  • “Rathbone” by Zach Ellenberger
  • “The Glorious Protection of Angels” by Michelle Ann King
  • “The Jump” by Pauline Yates
  • “Three Bad Things” by Kathy Kingston

Ancient Days and Apocalypse Now

  • “Butterflies of the Longest Night” by Russell Hammell
  • “Death, and the Scent of Tea” by Cheryl Zaidan
  • “The Day in Gold” by Adele Gardner
  • “The Savage Night” by Pedro Iniguez
  • “Valhalla is a Lie” by Benjamin Thomas

Strange Adventures and Weird Journeys

  • “Among Stars and Stones” by Brandon Barrows
  • “Mother Winter” by Matthew Chabin
  • “He Gets Hungry Sometimes” by Carol Gyzander
  • “The Little People” by Kurt Newton
  • “They Never Left” by Matthew McKiernan

A Murder of Gargoyles

  • “Gargoyle of the World, Unite!” by Mary Jo Rabe
  • “Odd Job Tom” by Eddie Generous
  • “The Grotesque” by Rhonda Parrish (poem)

The Scientific Method

  • “Aegir’s Son” by Edward Ahern
  • “Bottled Rage” by Owen Auch
  • “Voyage of the PFV-4” by David Rose

Ghosts and the Grave

  • “Good Boy Anyway” Briana McGuckin
  • “The Infinity of Worse” by Ken Hueler
  • “The Problem with Bottling Troublesome Spirits” by Juleigh Howard-Hobson

Demon-Haunted World

  • “A Bed Both Long and Narrow” by Sipora Coffelt
  • “Blooms of Darkness” by Melissa Miles
  • “Face to Face” by Tom Leveen

An Eye for an Eye

  • “Inside a Refrigerator” by Adrian Ludens
  • “Ocular” by Nidheesh Samant
  • “Penance” by J.V. Gachs
  • “The Binding of Chrysanthoula” by Angeliki Radou

End of the Line

  • “Devil’s Oak” by Mary Leoson
  • “Nature versus Nurture” by Gerri Leen (poem)
  • “The Ocean’s Misfortune” by Alison McBain
  • “The Woman in the Wallpaper” by Gregory L. Norris
  • “Cold Storage” by Jude Reid

The Lost Librarian’s Grave: Gargoyle Cover

The sense that I’m getting is the gargoyle cover is the most popular of the original three both from the comments I’ve seen on this blog and from running them by people I know, who don’t read the blog. So I did some tweaks over the weekend on the gargoyle covers and this is what I’ve come up with so far.

I fiddled around with some filters and made the gargoyle and rusty reptiles a little more vibrant, which I like better than the original. The cover on the far right is the same one from the original post but with said filters applied. Dave of Faith & Steel, when he was commenting on the original covers, wrote that he was “ambivalent” on the framing of the original picture. I thought about what he said and decided it would be fun to get rid of the framing and see how it looked.

I’m not sure which one I currently like the best, but the one on the left, where I took out the stone background, does seem like I could put a small block of text in the middle right area. Perhaps a list of some of the authors or something like that. I don’t know if I will do that, assuming I go with that design, but it is something to think about.

If anyone has any further ideas or observations about the covers, I welcome your comments.*

Imagine being petrified but fully aware in this form for hundreds of years!**

I kind of have gargoyles on the brain now. I’ve been trying to think of some good short stories that I’ve read featuring gargoyles and I have to admit that nothing comes to mind. I even went back through my reading diary, where I’ve been keeping track of my reading since 2010 — nothing there either.

I did find a couple of things on Amazon. The first is a short story called “The Beast Within” by D.F. Holland, that I was able to download for free. I’ll probably read that tonight. The second is a collection by Clark Ashton Smith called The Maker of Gargoyles and Other Stories. Some of the reviewers say it isn’t his best work, but I am considering picking up the e-book anyway since I’m a fan of Smith. Especially his poetry.

My next steps with the anthology are to continue work on the new website and to put together some writer’s guidelines. Speaking of guidelines, I’ll have to remember to mention that I’d love to read some gargoyle stories. Hope everyone is doing well.


* Thank you to everyone who responded thus far. I value and appreciate your opinions.

** Photo of “Gargoyles Magdalen College Oxford England” by Chris Creagh. I made no changes. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribuion-Share Alike 3.0.

January Thaw: Short Story

School has been keeping me pretty busy, and one of the things we’re doing is mucking about with social media as writers, potential writers, people posing as writers, etc.  So I’ve been flogging around my short story, January Thaw, in various places and thought I’d make a link to it available on Ye Olde Blog for anyone who might be interested.

January Thaw posits a future where old age is a thing of the past and no one dies anymore. Carolyn Deschaines is a woman who has lived too long, and after 150 years she has decided to gracefully “die of old age.” She puts her affairs in order but then she meets Theo…

January Thaw 350 pixels wide

Additionally, I finished the Red Spiny Back Poxwalker, who is now ready to take to the field with its green twin. I hope to get some pictures of my newest addition to the Festering Horde soon.