April 2020 “Paint the Crap You Already Own!” Painting Challenge Round-up (Part 1 of 2)

My thoughts turned (as they often do, especially when I’m buying another box of undead or demons or something) to the fact that most of us already have a box or closet or garage full of unpainted plastic and wouldn’t it be nice to chip away at that mountain, even if only symbolically?  Thus the Paint the Crap You Already Own! painting challenge was born.

We have twenty-two artists, who contributed pictures of their work, this time around.  As you will see, this post is quite long.  So I decided to split the round-up into two parts.

If you click on the various pictures and such, many of them will take you to the painter’s website.  Click on the galleries to see larger versions of the pictures.  (As usual there are a few Easter Eggs here and there.) Thank you to everyone who participated and I will get the second part out just as soon as I can.

Who better to place in the vanguard of this month’s offerings than a squad of Mcmattilaminis’ nicely painted space marine scouts with shotguns led by the sergeant with a big fist?

I like the basing skulls, particularly the orkish one.

Mcmattilaminis reports that he did quite a bit of work modifying these guys.  He used Scion heads, which I agree look good on these guys.  I also appreciate his nod to tradition in having the sergeant eschew wearing (or even carrying) a helmet.

I thought the backpacks were a nice touch too and added a lot both from an aesthetic and gaming standpoint.  (These also came from the Scion box.)  They look good and if you use these scouts in a game they can pay the points and have camo cloaks or if you’d rather not, well, they’re rolled up and stowed.

Nice job on the camo cloaks.

Mcmattilamini also presents three orks, which seem like they’d make suitable enemies for our scouts.  I like the weather and armor chipping and the orange is pretty.  Plenty colorful too.  The freehand work on the helmets and shoulder pads and the little “evil sun” on the boy’z shoulder pad on the right are all nice touches.

I like how he uniforms aren’t identical …

… but still appear unified along the same theme.

Mikeland82 from Starship Vorenus writes that “from 28th Feb through to the end of June I would buy no new minis, and focus on the backlog.”  In other words he’s going to paint the crap he already owns.  Good man!  He made excellent progress for May as the gallery below illustrates.  (You can also see some larger pictures of these models by clicking on the gallery or still larger yet on the round-up post in his blog.)

My personal favorites are the Last of the Mohicans figures.  I remember these miniatures from a Muskets & Tomahawks game I played at a convention some years ago.  I also like how Mike based them so they are carefully advancing through the tall grass.  The brown roots evoke memories of wetlands for me because I’ve hiked and hunted many times through exactly this kind of thing back in my ancestral stomping grounds of New England.  Never met any Mohicans but I’d occasionally meet a Penobscot.

Turning toward the gigantic now, we have Lordcommandereloth’s, of Eloths Endeavours, mighty “Stick Man” with a giant sword that his wife bought him for their 5th wedding anniversary.  As he reports, this is most appropriate since this the wooden anniversary.  Good thinking indeed on both their parts!

A lot of interesting stuff going on with this highly impressive centerpiece ent.

I think LMC did a brilliant job.  I particularly like the bark and all the many details, such as the red shelf mushrooms, the sword and staff, the leaf loincloth and of course the base.  L.C. Eloth says that he did the bark by basing with a cream color, washing with dark brown and then dry brushing progressively lighter colors ending with white.  Smashing.  Did I say that I liked the bark yet because I really do?

In addition to all of this arboreal goodness, I found some interesting work-in-progress posts as well:

Next up is that rather prolific painter, Azazel of Azazel’s Bitz Box, with, well, lots of different things.  Imagine, for a moment, that you have been challenged to play a game with whatever figures you can paint in 30 days.  The game is Mishmash 40,000 where your force is more effective and you unlock key capabilities by putting together something like what we have below.

Azazel's April 2020 Wrap Up Photo

I respectfully submit, Gentle Reader, that this is a power gamer’s list for Mishmash 40K!

If you would like to know more about these miniatures, I’ve included a list of Azazel’s individual posts.  Something I find interesting about reading his site is that he enjoys working on older pieces and one gets to see some unlikely and obscure items from the past on his blog.  From more or less left to right (more or less) from the above image:

As Azazel pointed out, a few things he painted didn’t make it into the above group picture.  He painted two of the “industrial pallets” from the Battlefield Accessories Set, of which I only see one.  His Slaaneshi Champion, from 1988, who has been sitting neglected for maybe 20 years never made it into the picture and neither did a respectably large collection of cages and chains.  I don’t know if it is just me, but do you think perhaps there might be some sort of dark prince-based connection here?

Azazel's Wizkid's Cages

I definitely could come up with some interesting house rules for this terrain.

Azazel's Champion of Slaanesh

Twenty years and now a fully painted Slave to Darkness!

Azazel's two Reiksgard Foot Knights

“Reiksguard Knighrts, your Emperor is calling!”

We turn now from ancient miniatures cast during the mists of time and left sitting on desks throughout dark antiquities to a painter, who is making her debut on the pages of this blog, and exhibits her art using the non de plume of The Little Elf.  Her work can be primarily found at Double Down Dice, where she is assisted by Faust.

I like Little Elf’s choice of colors for Her Little Pony.  One wonders what the pony’s name is and what magical powers our equine friend exhibits?

Faust’s offering is another Blood Bowl entry, well, sort of.  He is planning to use the prosperous fellow below as a “dwarf coach” for his team, though I agree with Faust that Coach could also “do double duty as a merchant, noble, etc. for other games.”  Whatever the case, surrounded as he is by all of those chests of treasure, Blood Bowl seems to be treating him well.  What more could any dwarf want?

Faust said that the gold bands on the chest are lighter in the picture than in person.

Speaking of the chests, Faust reports that he used Contrast paints for the wood, “which was nice and quick.”  He used Army Painter Light Tone shade for the metal parts.  I liked how the wood turned out and the word “quick” got my attention as it always does, so I asked him in the comments what he used for paints.

Faust wrote that he used Gore-Grunta Fur Contrast for the open chest, Wyldwood Contrast for the darkest one, and Aggaros Dunes Contrast for the lightest chest.  “Washes were only used sparingly towards the base on most of the chests.”

Thanks, Faust, I’m definitely going to give this a try on my two Etsy chests!

Glad the painting challenge helped you get this guy done!  I like the cloak.

Next up we have The Introverted Hermit, who some of you might know as (among other things) the Monday Maker of Mandalas.  This month she completed some interesting (and useful speaking from someone who plays D&D with a grid map) bases and bunch of “miniatures I’ve had shoved in drawers for months.”  Sounds like an ideal project for the “Paint the Crap You Already Own” challenge!

Here we have our Stone Golem friend, who made its debut in the advertisment for the upcoming May Miniatures of Magnitude challenge.  I would say from the expression on its face, some treasure robber is going to have a bad day.

Stone Golem by The Introverted Hermit

Love the mean, glaring expression.

As for the treasure this lithic chap is guarding, I.H. helpfully supplied some treasure bases, including this one and some more in the gallery …

The Introverted Hermit treasure base

I think my 3rd level Fighter could retire with all of this loot.

… and being ever-helpful, there are also some bases of bones, entrails, and such in the gallery just in case things go awry for any plunderers of ancient wizards’ towers.

Last and not least, just in case our adventurers don’t run afoul of bandits, gnolls, bugbears, mind flayers, bat swarms, and trolls, plus make it past the stone golem, there is this Mummy Captain and/or Lord as a suitable end boss.  In addition to dual-wielding a couple of khopesh-looking blades, the good captain/lord may also have defenses and powers formed from the dreams/nightmares of the intrepid DM!

The Introverted Hermit Egyptian theme skeleton

“Join me in death, vile mortals!”

Continuing down the black road of eldritch magicks, undeath, darkness and perhaps even “vile mortals,” we have another Reaper offering from Dave at The Imperfect Modeller —  the aptly named Marise Greyshroud (and friends).

The Imperfect Modeller Marise Greyshroud front

One wonders what the writing on the sword says.

I must say that Dave has been doing a good job of marketing for Reaper between their fun miniatures and his great painting skills.  Last month his wizard caused me (or perhaps ensorcelled me, who knows?) to go over the their website, make an account, and put a bunch of their miniatures onto my nascent wish list.

Besides being nicely painted, Queen Greyshroud (or perhaps Greenshroud?) would certainly make a meet sovereign for some wraiths I started assembling.  Yet more grist for the mill of my Reaper wish list?

Ghostly Ink Sketch from The Imperfect Modeller's Marise Greyshroud 125 wide

I think it is best, before I hand the good folks at Reaper all my credit cards, to perhaps plane shift over to the more solid ground of Napoleon and the 19th Century, courtesy of Marvin at Suburban Militarism.  For April, he undertook the fairly ambitious project of completing these 28 figures representative of Napoleon’s Old Guard.

Twenty-eight Old Guard in 1/72 scale by Strelets.

Marvin says that he liked how the miniatures had interesting “facial features which seem to give each pose character.”  He goes on to opine:  “Perhaps my favourite is this fella below who seems to be casting a quizzical glance askew.”  (He is speaking of the soldier in the largest image on the right in the gallery below.)  I wonder if the grizzled veteran can’t help but think of all that has happened over his years of service and wonder how it all could have come to this?

The “this” I’m referring to is of course Napoleon’s farewell address before he leaves for his exile to the Isle of Elba in 1814.  Marvin has put down some sand and arrayed his Old Guard into a hollow square in front of his 18th Century country house that has also seen duty as an ersatz palace.

“Soldiers of my Old Guard, after 20 years I have come to say goodbye!”

Here we have Napoleon Bonaparte.  The figure below also comes with the Strelets kit, which I think is a nice touch.  Marvin, as a painting guide, “settled on some portraits of him wearing a grey overcoat and the uniform of a colonel of the Chasseurs a Cheval,” and including “a silver medal with a red ribbon” he often wore.

L’Empereur Himself!

All quite well done, I’d say, but Marvin wasn’t done yet.  No, not by a long shot.  He decided to make a Youtube video, “Napoleon leaves for Elba”.  This link will take you directly to the video, where you can leave Marvin a like if you wish.

You can also access the video from his page or see a non-video pictorial transcript of the farewell.  Marvin was kind enough to allow me to post the video here as well.

We say farewell (or bon voyage perhaps?) now to Napoleon and hoof it west, hop a boat, hoof it west some more and finally hop into our moves-temporally-while-staying-in-the-same-place time machine from France to the Aztec Empire.

Mark Morin recently purchased a bunch of miniatures that were from the ’70s to the ’90’s, including a bunch of Badger Games Aztecs.  He originally didn’t have a “fully developed concept” for them, but then he “volunteered to write a supplement covering the Spanish Conquest of the Americas in the 16th Century,” and thus he had a reason to paint up his miniatures.  Let’s begin things with Mark’s novice warriors.

Mark Morin Group shot of 12 novices

I’m sure what the novices lack in experience they more than make up for their enthusiasm.

Mark reports that “a major aspect of warfare of this period was the overriding need to take captives.”  A novice could advance to veteran status by taking suitable prisoners.  (You can read more about what he has to say on the subject here.)

Next up are the veteran eagle warriors.  These guys and the novices represent the beginning of what Mark hopes will someday be an impressive force of 150 painted models.  I like how colorful these Aztecs are, so I agree that many warriors would look very nice on the tabletop.

Mark Morin Eagle Warriors advancing close up

Veterans on the run brandishing their tepoztopilli (spears).

I fondly remember the days of lead miniatures so it comes as no surprise to me that Mark wrote that the spears were “spaghetti-like” and “vulnerable to bending.”  I liked his solution, which was to put a thin layer of Apoxie Sculpt on the weapons, which made them less bendy.  That is a great idea that I’m going to remember.  Mark details the process he used here if you are interested.  I’m looking forward to seeing what the future brings for his 150 warrior horde. 

Tarmor of Dragons of Lancasm, who is “married with four chickens,” completed five Reaper miniatures this month.  He hasn’t been painting as much because he’s getting ready to play Shadowrun, but five is “more painting than I’ve achieved any other month this year!” so it sounds good to me.  Heck, I would count five as a darned good month in my household so well done, Tarmor!

Dragons of Lancasm front view

I like Mal’s glowing, green eyes.

The miniatures represent, from left to right, “Reaper 03893 “Mal” Catfolk Warrior, SW76 Mon Calamari, SW26 Bossk (trandoshan bounty hunter), SW77 Engineer, & SW27 Weequay.”

Dragons of Lancasm back view

Looks like the Star Wars contingent isn’t getting along very well at the moment!

He plans on using the Reaper Catfolk Warrior as “one of the player characters” in his D20 Gamma World game.  The other Star Wars figures were produced by West End Games/Grenadier as part of boxed sets in 1988-89, and he purchased them back then.

Glad to see you were able to get some of those vintage figures you’ve had sitting around painted up!

Dragons of Lancasm Catfolk Warrior Reaper 03893 ink sketch 150 wide

Obliterators are used to endings (or ending peoples’ lives, rather!) so I think a pair of these guys are a good place to close out part one of our round-up.  The Word Bearers are strong over at Dreadaxe Games as is evidenced by first a helbrute and now this fanatically gruesome (or gruesomely fanatical?) pair offered up for our spiritual edification and enslavement. 

Dreadaxe achieved his obliterators’ “mad pink” flesh by base coating with Rakarth Flesh, which he washed with Carroburg Crimson.  He “added Cruchii Violet to the recesses and some of the more bulbous areas of the skin for a bruised, infected look.”

On that happy note so ends Part One of the April 2020 “Paint the Crap You Already Own!” challenge.   Part Two will be about as long as this offering and I will publish it as soon as I can.  I hope you have enjoyed our little journey through space, time, and the imagination.  So we won’t say goodbye quite yet to our painting challenge but instead au revoir!

Napoleon doffing his hat stylized ink sketch 200 tall from picture by Suburban Militarism

A Two Eyed Poxbringer and the Yellow Mold

I finished up my poxbringer from the Start Collecting box for Azazel’s Jewel of July painting challenge.  The idea this time is to paint models that are sort of in the middle of the pecking order such as medics, lower level leaders, particularly swanky robots and so on.  They should stand out from the rank and file, but aren’t really mean to stand alone.

The poxbringer buffs other friendly Nurgle daemon units by making them a bit physically stronger, and he also fights directly with a rather vicious sword and by being a minor psyker.  He is no slouch in Age of Sigmar either.  So he seems like a great candidate for Jewel of July.

Why can’t nurglings ever take anything seriously?!

I added a new disease to my collection:  the dreaded Yellow Mold.  The poxbringer told me that this malady was originally brewed by an adept for use against some particularly troublesome feral orks, by mutating ork spores.  I told him that they just ripped off the idea from original Dungeons and Dragons.  He said that Nurgle’s Yellow Mold isn’t adversely affected by either intense light nor fire (though the carrier might be) and that besides, “Everyone knows that D&D is just a made up game as opposed to real life.”

Yikes! Looks like that yellow mold is catching.

For my Yellow Mold, I liberally applied some acrylic texture fiber paste that I mixed with a bit Averland Sunset paint to the area in question.  I teased the mixture so it would dry with a sort of furry or spiky texture.  I drybrushed the area around the mold with sunset, and then did another light drybrush with white paint.  I sealed the whole thing with a matte varnish to protect the pasted area, since the miniature will be handled a fair bit.

I used the left over paste on his sword with the idea that our poxbringer coats his blade with the mold, and occasionally leaves a victim alive but wounded….

I’m rather pleased at how the texture came out on his arm.

The mold initially makes itself known by its characteristic diuretic effect.  After several weeks of raging thirst the host dies from dehydration.  Delightfully, drinking more fluids seems to intensify and hasten the process.  The mold then throws off contagious, airborne spores and dies.  In the case of nurgle daemons it simply reaches an non-contagious equilibrium much like what is shown here with our friend.

If our friend wants the mold to become contagious, he waters it for about a week then stops.  The mold will then throw spores and settle back into a sort of dormant state.  Alternately (and preferably) he can force feed a portion of it to a victim, release that person and let nature takes its merry course.

So now some obligatory painfully close close-ups!

I personally propose purple guts are particularly pretty!   🙂

The purple bit is fairly subtle at tabletop distances, but it does a little variety to the usual bloody abdominal tableau.  The recipe came from the the very useful January 2018 White Dwarf.  I’m toying with the idea of testing it out as a flesh color on a daemonette, but we’ll see.

I put the suction palm-tentacle thing on his hand because I had a little extra green stuff left over from something else and I didn’t want to waste it.  Pretty much the same for the sword with the fiber paste mixure, as well as the fact that I had tried a couple of different things with the sword and still wasn’t satisfied.

 

So the first herald I painted, Urnafortunus, will more often than not receive a lateral transfer to the rank of spoilpox scrivener.  I like the scrivener’s powers but do not favor the official model.  It is nice enough but I’m not a fan of Nurgle daemons being accountants.  Such beings are meant to get their hands dirty.  Leave the paperwork to Tzeetch’s minions, who love such things, says I!

I’m continuing work on my poxwalkers and hope to have another to add to my growing mob for next time, along with a cultist who looks an awful lot like this guy.  Have been doing a lot of priming too and  hope to make a start on painting my trio of old school plague marines at some point soon.

Keeper of the Emerald Pox

I thought I’d put up some pictures of the mob leader of these plaguebearers I completed back in March.  This daemon bears the honorific Keeper of the Emerald Pox because she was the first one I tried it out on, even if she wasn’t the first miniature I finished bearing that disease.  Either way, the emerald pox has become one of my favorite maladies because I like the way it looks and the ease of application or infection, if you will.

Having a laugh with her (mostly) cheerful compatriots as they march toward victory!

 

Make sure you get my good side!

 

In the meantime I’m picking away at a few random neglected models for the current iteration of Azazel’s Neglected Model challenge for May 2018.  My plan is to get at least one model done by the end-of-month deadline.  So far the most promising candidate is an ork tankbusta I started in (maybe) 2015, though I’m also hopeful about finishing another one of my horribly neglected cultists as well.

ork bullet point graphic

April 2018 Assembly Challenge Complete

The group ended up being 41 models counting the invisible poxwalkers.

I finished assembling a bunch of models during April for Azazel’s April 2018 Assembly Challenge, and took a quick picture of what I did for the month from my terminally will-organize-it-eventually hobby room.

  • Great Unclean One
  • Warhounds of Chaos (10)
  • Daemonettes (8)
  • Raptors (3)
  • Possessed (3)
  • Space Marines: seven Dark Imperium Death Guard, and one of the green Easy to Build guys.
  • The Changeling
  • Darkoath Warqueen
  • Poxwalkers (6)

I particularly like the one with the frag grenades for some reason.

I remembered that I put together a box of Easy-to-Build poxwalkers at the beginning of April.  Actually I didn’t exactly remember.  I found them squirreled away in a drawer where I store stuff I built so it doesn’t get dusty, when I was looking for neglected models for the May painting challenge.  So a quick, over-exposed picture later and here they are in all of their green glory.

I didn’t do any custom work on most of the miniatures, though I did magnetize two of the three raptors, and gave them meltaguns as their first weapon choice. I traditionally tend to be weak in ranged anti-tank in my armies.  Apparently my generals think that running up to tanks and such and whacking them to pieces with swords is a good idea.

Swiss Army Raptors!

I think jump infantry are excellent guys to give meltaguns because in the current state of the game it is likely they’ll get into position for at least one good shot.  If not then these worthies will likely force my opponent in to a bubble wrapping or delayed deployment situation.  Forcing your opponent to move in a certain way can be a small victory in itself!

As for the Great Unclean One, I decided to go with the sword and flail combination. I’ve fought against the bile blade and bell, and while I like the bell, I didn’t think the blade fit my style of play very well.  The sword, while not exactly up to Bloodthirster standards of offense, still packs a pretty nice punch.  Mainly though, I’ve found the utility of this particular greater daemon to be presenting another (extremely resilient) target, which often allows my other, more fragile units a bit more scope.

One strange thing that came up with the Great Unclean One was assembling the flail.  I put the miniature together correctly, as far as I could tell, but the middle part was too long.  The middle skull contacted the base in a way that would have made assembly not possible, at least not without some unwonted modifications.

The solution I came up with was to hack off the skull and replace it with the end of the bile blade, which I wasn’t planning on using anyway.  I’m pleased with the result and think that it may add interest when painted.

GUO gave me a use for all of those maggots one ends up with collecting Nurgle.

The warqueen will make an admirable herald of Khorne for my 40K games.  I have owned a half-painted resin herald of Khorne for a couple of years now, but I never much liked the model.  On the other hand I like both of these models just fine.

The Changeling and Darkoath Warqueen

For May I think I’m going to participate in Azazel’s Paint a Neglected Model Challenge.  I don’t have quite the hobby time or energy, now that I’m working full time again, as I used to have, but I’m pretty sure I can complete at least one model this month.  Given that the challenge is it has to be a model that one started at least six months ago and didn’t complete, it’ll be nice to finish one or more such models.

I also have a box of old Vampire Counts zombies, as well as another box of bloodletters, I want to assemble but I think I’ll wait until the next assembly challenge to tackle those.

 

Plaguebearer With Banner

This is a closer look at the lucky and honored standard bearer from the mob of twenty plaguebearers I recently completed.+  At this point I should probably issue a Nurgle Warning:  there are one or two icky pictures if you continuing scrolling down.  Gifts of our generous Grandfather are not for the overly faint of hear- … er, stomach!

I tried to do a whole Cycle of Existence thing with the banner, where you have birth and life transitioning to various stages of decay and finally death what with Nurgle not just being exclusively all about the aforementioned death and decay as many (or at least some) of the uninitiated believe.

I put this model together and after the glue dried I noticed that one of its horns was pressed up against the bell in an awkward way.  I tried filing it down a little and didn’t like the results.  So I cut about halfway through the offending horn with some cutters and then tore it off.  I was going for a jagged break rather than the clean slice of the elegant Slaanesh Xacto knife.

Gives new meaning to talking out the side of your mouth.

I originally tried an experiment where I painted his belly teeth black.  It seemed good in my mind but I don’t think it worked out well at all on the model.  So I redid the teeth in a lighter color and then used some rust washes, with a final bit of blood and Nurgle’s rot.  The mouth doesn’t really stand out on the model at a distance, but I don’t want it to.  I like how it looks close up though.  The focal point of this guy should be the banner.  With that in mind I kept the plague sword kind of basic too.

“They’re not good dancers they don’t play drums … “

I’m really quite pleased with how the pile of worms on the base turned out.  So much so that I ended up putting a bunch of them on my Great Unclean One’s base when I put her together.  When you collect Nurgle, you are never at a shortage for nurglings nor little piles of intestinal parasites, though with the size of these beauties I’m thinking someone’s intestines had a little transformation and decided to go on crawl-about.

A somewhat confused but ultimately effective advance vs. an IG gun line.

So next time I’m hoping to put up a couple of pictures of a pink horror I painted as the first of a squad of ten to go with the brimstone and blue horrors I finished some time ago, who are now veterans of many a desperate battle.  I’m also working on another cultist as well, and the last odd plaguebearer that will finish off the ones from my Start Collecting box.

Nurgle image 125 wide

+  Twenty-two if you count the metal skeleton snake undead bit box thingie and the ancient Sebelex the Devourer!

A Prince Among Daemons

I finished this guy some time ago and I thought he’d make a nice respite from the endless Nurgle stuff I’ve been posting over the last few months (and the months to come, I’m sure).  He sat around for a couple of years in the box and then had a shamefully long career as an Unpainted Slayer.  Like many of my models, the ones I use a lot are the ones that get moved to the top of the painting queue. +

Note the purity seal; he’s certified 100% killy and quite buff too.

His highness has been my favored slave for many years and has led many a successful rampage, massacring hordes of enemy troops, hoofing it for linebreaker or legging it after hovering airplanes, directing his bloodletter minions in flipping over tanks, cleaving APC’s in twain with one mighty blow from his hellforged sword, and so on.  Truly, his catalog of feats is too storied to list in full here.  If anyone deserves to be a fully painted model, it is this fine fellow.  He truly is a prince among daemons!

His tail ended up on a bloodthirster, but I think the teal tong is working for him.

I magnetized the stacks coming out of his back so I could give him some wings if I wanted.  So far, I have found in 8th edition that wings are not really that necessary for him to carry out my directives.  Mostly he has been the leader of my Khornate spearhead forces, coming in behind enemy lines while my other minions do their thing.

I did the flesh in the same way I did my bloodletters.  If I had painted him now I might do it a bit differently, using a layering technique instead of (or in addition to) drybrushing, but I’m not inclined to mess with Good Enough.

A magnet and a malefic talon.

I also put a magnet on his left vambrace where I can affix a cyclone missile launcher that he occasionally commandeers/steals from the Tentacles for the All Father guys and uses these days as a counts-as warp bolter though in previous editions it served as a counts-as relic flamer (presumably shooting warp missiles), or some other random weapon.

Since his claw is a pretty good weapon in is own right, I painted it a little different than the rest of his body and included some miscellaneous symbols and script.

Think that cross piece could use a little Brasso or something.

The sword, which has turned out to be a gruesome weapon indeed in 8th edition, was my first experiment with the (then) new (to me) Nihilakh Oxide.  As it has turned out I love that stuff. ++

I sometimes imagine the sword to be a trophy he pried out of the dead tentacles of a defeated Nurgle prince in one of the many Wars of Establishing the Pecking Order.  Being a Khorne daemon and thus having some sense of decorum and cleanliness … aka Burn It With Fire, I’m sure he occasionally gives it to his attending bloodletters and tells them something like, “It’ll be clean enough to eat off, you scum, or I’ll know the reason why.”  Nevertheless, some rust remains even after endless bloodletter tongue polishing.  There are limits; it is a Nurgle sword.  I think at the end of the day our prince figures if he doesn’t catch any too-lingering diseases from the thing, it’s a win.

I was able to scrounge some other daemon prince pieces and with the extras you get in the regular box I have a complete axe daemon ready to assemble.  It has been languishing in a sandwich baggie for a couple of years though.

Deep Striking in 7th Ed:  “Guys, we were supposed to stick together!”

Further, a couple of months ago I picked up another new daemon prince kit when one of the game stores I play at was offering a 50% discount to get rid of some stuff.  So I’m thinking that eventually I’ll do a prince of Nurgle and probably one of Slaanesh.  I also have an old Fantasy Chimera kit, which I got at a huge (I forget how much) discount some years ago when another store was getting out of the Games Workshop business entirely.  That thing will probably be my Tzeentch prince, as well as possibly a Chimera.

Ambitious plans indeed.  In reality they’ll probably languish for some time yet while I work on current projects.  I do have the bad habit of collecting too much stuff I take forever getting to, but I try to balance that with the good habit of finishing the stuff I work on, though perhaps Becky the Bloater is a rare lapse from that good habit.

For next time I’m hoping to do either a battle report of our last game or perhaps some pictures of a couple of plaguebearers from the recent Cloud of Flies.

khorne20bullet20point20graphic2002_zpsh7cfhuus

+  I used to subscribe to the ancient maxim of “If they ain’t painted they don’t go on the table.”  The problem I found with that was I’d buy new stuff and then by the time it saw play an edition or two would have passed and it’d be old stuff.  Now my maxim is “if I play with it a lot then I work on painting it.”  This is much more satisfying in that I get to play with new stuff and my forces still do get painted, at least eventually.

++ Common wisdom dictated the axe was a better choice in 8th edition, but that was before it was universally recognized that modifiers are applied after re-rolls.  Given the prince’s re-roll aura buff and that the various points costs have been changed to something reasonable, I think a case can be made for both weapons (or for neither!) and it comes down to individual preference, build, or in my case WYSIWYG considerations.

Maggotmouth and Friend

The Plaguebearer Express rolls on as I continue toward completing a mob by the end of the month for the Squadary Painting Challenge.  The current offerings represent numbers four and five of the requisite ten daemon squad.  My plan is to have two or three more done on Monday and then wrap things up with a group picture on the 28th.

Maggotmouth here seems to be having a bad day for some reason.

Also, I am finished with the original ten daemons that aren’t part of this challenge but are part of my associated goal of bringing my painted numbers up to twenty by the end of the month.  I will include those miniatures in the aforementioned group shot and then do some individual posts in later weeks.

I originally decided to do something a little different with Maggotmouth’s sword and painted it the same as I did the flesh on my January cultist.  I wasn’t sure if I liked it or not, but for plaguebearers in general the weapon sort of just blended in with rest of the diseased mass of daemons.  Perhaps it might have been a better idea to try on a space marine?

So I started in with the various washes until I ended up with the sword you see above.  I like it better but I don’t remember exactly what I did.  I imagine it was mostly using Carroburg Crimson and Glossy Nuln Oil.  It still doesn’t stand out too much in a group, which is fine, but I do like it better now because it is more grist for the mill of my plaguebearers using swords that all a bit different while not distracting from the daemons themselves.  Know your role, as it were.

Not so MM’s partner(s).  “Every day in Real Space is a good day!” they chirp.

Plaguebearer Five’s (or Fifteen’s if you count the original ten) right arm is an extra from the plague drone kit.  Five and his running partner, Blue Belly, have a bit of a story to them.  I seemed to be in the middle of a spate of dropping miniatures when I was working on this guy.

So I’m in the middle of working on Five while I’m watching tv with my husband, as usual.  I let out with an expletive and my husband, not even looking over says, “Drop one again, huh?”  I look down and congratulate myself on my good luck.  The miniature landed perfectly, just as you see here with nary a scratch.  Then I looked a little closer….

Lucky, huh?

Five must have bounced off the top of his horn, done a one-eighty and then landed feet-first.  I fixed his horn by using my hobby knife as if I were putting a point back on a pencil.  I think it came out fine and I can only hope that anyone picking up my miniatures without permission chooses Five and gets stuck in the hand for their trouble!  Maybe if they are particularly lucky that day they’ll catch a dose of the Emerald Pox.

Maybe not so much.

I might do a weekend post if I have time.  I am almost finished with my single cultist for Azazel’s Complete a Neglected Model(s) challenge.  Just need to throw some sand on his base and let it dry.

I’m going to put a second neglected model into the queue and see if I can finish it before the end of the month.  Maybe another cultist since at my current rate of progress from when I finished the first guy to the second, I will have finished the entire twenty man squad by August 2022.  I think there is an outside possibility I can do better than that!